War Remnants Museum

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  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
  • War Remnants Museum
Location

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Address

28 Vo Van Tan, Ward 6, District 3, Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam

Getting there

Bus Route No. 14: BX Eastern - 3/2 - BX West.
Bus Route No. 28: Ben Thanh Market Cho Xuan Thoi Thuong
Bus Route No. 06: Cholon BX - University of Agriculture and Forestry

Telephone

+84-8 3930 5587 | +84-8 3930 6664

Email

info@warremnantsmuseum.com

Fax

+84-8 3930 2340

More information

http://warremnantsmuseum.com/, https://facebook.com/pages/War-Remnants-Museum/, https://foursquare.com/v/war-remnants-museum/

Prices

Fares: 15.000d/person
Vietnam with preferential ticket price: 2,000 / person
Visitors students, students, armed forces, veterans, senior officials of the revolution has been reduced from 50% to 100% of the fare rules.
Visitors are war invalids and martyrs' families, those with children under 6 years of age, children in remote areas is free to visit.

Opening hours

All days of the week (including holidays). daily from 07.30 - 12.00 and 13:30 – 17:00

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By visiting one of the most famous history museums, the War Remnants Museum, you have totally transformed your ordinary visit to Ho Chi Minh City to an intellectual yet remarkable trip.

The War Remnants Museum once known as the ‘Museum of American War Crimes’ first opened to the public in 1975.

It’s a shocking reminder of the long and brutal Vietnam War with many graphic photographs and American military equipment on display, including a helicopter with rocket launchers, a tank, a fighter plane, a single-seater attack aircraft and a 6,800kg conventional bomb.

Formerly the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes, the War Remnants Museum is consistently popular with Western tourists. Few museums anywhere convey the brutality of war and its civilian victims. Many of the atrocities documented here were well-publicised but rarely do Westerners hear the victims of US military action tell their own stories. While some displays are one-sided, many of the most disturbing photographs illustrating US atrocities are from US sources, including those of the infamous My Lai Massacre.

US armoured vehicles, artillery pieces, bombs and infantry weapons are on display outside. One corner of the grounds is devoted to the notorious French and South Vietnamese prisons on Phu Quoc and Con Son Islands. Artefacts include that most iconic of French appliances, the guillotine, and the notoriously inhumane ‘tiger cages’ used to house Viet Cong (Vietnamese Communists; VC) prisoners.

The ground floor of the museum is devoted to a collection of posters and photographs showing support for the antiwar movement internationally. This somewhat upbeat display provides a counterbalance to the horrors upstairs.

Even those who supported the war are likely to be horrified by the photos of children affected by US bombing and napalming. You’ll also have the rare chance to see some of the experimental weapons used in the war, which were at one time military secrets, such as the flechette, an artillery shell filled with thousands of tiny darts.

Upstairs, look out for the Requiem Exhibition . Compiled by legendary war photographer Tim Page, this striking collection documents the work of photographers killed during the course of the conflict, on both sides, and includes works by Larry Burrows and Robert Capa.

The War Remnants Museum is in the former US Information Service building. Captions are in Vietnamese and English.

All these weapons were used by America against the Vietnamese at some point during the infamous war that lasted from 1945-1975.

History, highlights and features

One of the most talked-about exhibits are the ‘tiger cages’ in which the South Vietnamese government kept their political prisoners. These small cages are only 2.7m x 1.5m x 3m each and were sometimes used to keep up to 14 prisoners in. There is also a guillotine used by the French and the South Vietnamese to execute prisoners from opposing political groups. Brought to Vietnam by the French; the guillotine was last used in 1960.

Also featured are grisly photos that show the disfigured bodies of locals who had prenatal exposure to strong pesticide and chemical sprayed, best known by the name ‘Agent Orange’. Vietnamese Ministry of Foreign Affairs believed that there were 500,000 children born with birth defects while as many as 4.8 million people were exposed to it from 1961 to 1971.

The War Remnants Museum is in District 3, Ho Chi Minh City and is run by the government. It is open all year round from 07:30 to17:00. A visit to this war museum is a disturbing experience for most people and may not be suitable for children (though they are allowed to enter).

A lesson of war

Vietnamese Wars possibly the only thing in mind of foreigners before coming to this nation. Though the country has changed itself and the prejudice has somehow been replaced by a new modern developing image, it’s crucial for tourists to look at the war from a different perspective. And this famous museum is where they can transform an ordinary visit to an intellectual yet remarkable trip.

Nowadays, the museum functions as a place to display devastation of the war between 2 countries from 1961 to 1975. It comprises several buildings storing military equipment, as well as disturbing photographs about the traumatizing consequences of Agent Orange, napalm and phosphorus bombs. There are also pictures about atrocities such as My Lai massacre, a guillotine used by Southern Government of Vietnam. In addition, last but not least three jars of deformed human features indicating haunting effects of the war on the next generations. A number of unexploded ordnances are stored in the corner of the yard, seemingly with their charges removed. Not only does the museum illustrate a phase of painful history, but it also tells unknown stories about war to people, especially to Westerners. Many preceding travelers have failed to hold their tears in front of the pictures here.

How to get there

The museum lies in the corner between Vo Van Tan St. and Le Quy Don St. 

Suggested means of transportation are taxi or motorbike. Bus-goers can take Bus No. 28 at Ben Thanh Bus Station, also (read more about Ho Chi Minh City bus). The museum opens daily from 8.00AM to 11.45 AM and 1.30PM to 4.45PM and entrance fee: 10,000VND

If you are interested in the history of the  Vietnam War, do not ever forget to pay a visit to this museum. Many preceding travelers have failed to hold their tears in front of the pictures from the past. Feel it yourself.

Reviews by visitors

Only had two and a half hours to look round Could have spent that long in most of the rooms Unrealistic in their depiction of American POWs experience Check out the comments book as you leave to learn the views of some American Vets who have visited

~Fiona

Stunning revisit of history. Reconciliation. Dynamic and sensitive, but truthful and to the point. Go early to miss the crowds.

~Stefan

As an Australian, it was confronting to see the war from the Vietnamese perspective. But very healthy to do so. Not as fancy as first world equivalents and a bit doctrinal in approach, but absolutely worth it.

~Tim L

As part of the generation of Australians who were deliberately lied to about Vietnam and why our brothers may die there I found this museum to be tragic. Also there is a lack of respect shown for the Vietnamese who fought against the victors that I found disturbing.

~Gabriel

There are lots of reviews of the War Remnants Museum on here and elsewhere, so I was expecting a particularly harrowing and one-sided affair. It wasn't quite like that, perhaps because I was already interested in military history so had already been horrified by Calley and Medina at My Lai (and had some faith in humanity returned by Thompson, Colburn and Andreotta), had already looked into the disgrace that was Agent Orange, and had already visited many war museums like the resistance museum in Amsterdam. I'll return to these thoughts later.

After paying 15k VND per person, the recommended route takes you to the top floor and the room of 'historical truths' (on reflection, that implies the other rooms aren't), which is a collection of photo displays setting out the history of the country from French colonisation through to the Vietnam war. Requiem is the next room, subtitled "Photo collection of the US aggressive war in Vietnam" which is a disappointing name as it's actually a haunting and thoughtful collection of photos taken by correspondents who were killed or 'disappeared' in the conflict. It seems to use the original captions from whichever agency or journal they were written for, so is arguably the most truthful exhibit; it was certainly my favourite. This room blends into two more which contain photos from Japanese photographers. 

On the next floor are perhaps the most difficult exhibitions - the war crimes section containing details on My Lai and other atrocities committed (or alleged to have been, some are unverifiable while others are clear) by Americans and (once) South Koreans, and the Agent Orange room. This, cleverly painted in orange and black, holds photos of genetic defects in children, some now grown up, others more recent, which are probably the result of dioxin poisoning in their parents. It is hard to look at, particularly the glass case of preserved deformed stillborn babies.

The ground floor has propaganda posters from many countries against US involvement, and currently has an exhibition of the north Vietnamese treatment of American prisoners of war - all rather jolly, apparently. There is even a picture of US Senator John McCain smiling, with no mention of how he can't lift his arms above the shoulder due to the torture inflicted on him during his time in captivity.

Outside is the recreation of jail conditions for some political prisoners and those suspected of supporting the north or engaging in terrorist activities. These people were tortured by their South Vietnamese jailers, and the displays here are gruesome. Finally there is a display of captured US jets, helicopters, artillery and boats.

Is the museum one sided? Yes, but I think that is to be expected from a museum formerly called the US atrocity museum (or war crime, depending on translation) - it would be more accurate to revert to this, as that's what it mainly covers. As I said, some of the displays are better at balance than others. There is also no mention of the North Vietnamese massacres and torture, nor is much made of the same committed by the South Vietnamese. Weirdly, very little at all is made of the efforts of the North Vietnamese army or the Viet Cong. I don't think many such museums with bias and omission would last long in the West.

Does this make it a bad museum? I don't think so, provided you have the means and motivation to research the rest of the story, and for most this is possible. The museum is well laid out, and well curated, with a lot of interesting exhibits. I'd certainly recommend a visit for foreigners. On the other hand, I could say that for the people of Vietnam it is a bad museum, reinforcing their indoctrinated views, and not encouraging independent research. For me, it was worthwhile.

~Gyppo

The museum is excellent if one critically keeps in mind that only one side of the coin is shown here. Rooms are modern and with AC and text in English and Vietnamese.

Many tourists come to this museum each day and there are many taxis and motorbikes waiting outside offering their services. There is a criminal taxi driver outside who has a cap that looks like Mailinh but it is not and a fake. You will realize soon that the taxi meter spins and doubles each 15 seconds or so. When I asked the taxi driver he suddenly did not speak English and I asked to stop. Bill was 68.000 VD for a distance I had expected to be 40.000 VD. I paid with a 100.000 VD bill that the driver immediately switched with a 10.000 VD bill and asked me to pay correctly. I was confused and now paid with a 500.000 VD (I did not have any smaller money) and he returned 26.000 VD. When I realized what was going on I started screaming at him to give back the 500.000 VD to me and insulted him. This must have been so unexpected to him that he returned the 500.000VD to me and I left the taxi. He followed me claiming I did not pay but when I got attention with the situation he escaped. 

My recommendation: Take photo of license plate and driver and hold the money in your hand so he can revise. Get out the taxi if you feel it is a scam. 

I never had bad experience with Vinasun or Mailinh.

~Edgar

Many have stated that this museum represents but one side of the conflict. I beg to differ, as seldomly are the victims of war able to speak out. Today's wars have been sanitized by governments and the press, controlling access to the information, by censoring and preventing dissemination of the resulting carnage. 

There is a fundamental truth spoken in this museum : war should never be entered in. It is carried out for profit and greed. It makes no sense and the price in human suffering is always too great. All leaders entering or espousing war should be held accountable and they should suffer the same fate of the innocents who died needlessly.

~Irone

We went to this museum twice. It is an extremely important museum, in my opinion, and one which ought to be seen. However, it evokes strong reaction, and can be upsetting.

What I found upsetting were the photos of the victims of the chemical Agent Orange which the US forces dropped on the jungles of Vietnam to clear the jungles of vegetation. The photos show people with horrific deformities and horrific injury. It is upsetting. It also made me feel very angry. I felt angry at the injustice for the people who were so affected by the chemicals used. That was not a benign chemical. It has devastating effects. It was a weapon. 

This museum shows the horrors of the war.

There are other exhibitions, including one showing a typical prison cell. When I peaked in to the cell, I jumped back in fright because the figure of an emaciated prisoner looked so real. 

There are also weapons and a tank on site.

There are different buses that go past the museum, if you are not in walking distance.
Bus Route No. 14: BX Eastern - 3/2 - BX West.
Bus Route No. 28: Ben Thanh Market Cho Xuan Thoi Thuong
Bus Route No. 06: Cholon BX - University of Agriculture and Forestry

Admission costs 15.000d/luot/nguoi with discounts offered for some categories of people.

~Chringiss

Visited the War Remnants Museum after went to the Reunification Palace, as a part of Ho Chi Minh city tour.

The War Remnants Museum (Vietnamese: Bảo tàng chứng tích chiến tranh) is located at 28 Vo Van Tan, in District 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The exhibits inside and outside are primarily from the American -Vietnam stage of war.

Entry fee 15.000 Dong, Opening hours 7.30am-noon & 1.30-5pm.

Time sure flies when we're at this museum , glad that we came early , but its still not enough time to see it all , until we were told to get out on 12.00 noon, when the siren rangs.

Quoted from lonely planet :

This Museum ,once known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes, the War Remnants Museum is consistently popular with Western tourists. 

Few museums anywhere drive home so effectively the brutality of war and its many civilian victims. Many of the atrocities documented here were well publicised but rarely do Westerners get to hear the victims of US military action tell their own stories.

While the displays are one-sided, many of the most disturbing photographs illustrating US atrocities are from US sources, including those of the infamous My Lai Massacre.

US armoured vehicles, artillery pieces, bombs and infantry weapons are on display outside. One corner of the grounds is devoted to the notorious French and South Vietnamese prisons on Phu Quoc and Con Son Islands. Artifacts include that most iconic of French appliances, the guillotine, and the notoriously inhumane ‘tiger cages’ used to house Viet Cong (Vietnamese Communists; VC) prisoners.

The ground floor of the museum is devoted to a collection of posters and photographs showing support for the antiwar movement internationally. This somewhat upbeat display provides a counterbalance to the horrors upstairs.

Even those who supported the war are likely to be horrified by the photos of children affected by US bombing and napalming. You’ll also have the rare chance to see some of the experimental weapons used in the war, which were at one time military secrets, such as the flechette , an artillery shell filled with thousands of tiny darts.

Upstairs, look out for the Requiem Exhibition . Compiled by legendary war photographer Tim Page, this striking collection documents the work of photographers killed during the course of the conflict, on both sides, and includes works by Larry Burrows and Robert Capa.

The War Remnants Museum is in the former US Information Service building. Captions are in Vietnamese and English.
This Museum told us the true story behind the war, a difference between ideology ,at least in the Vietnamese point of view , this war or any war in this planet , should not happen again.

~Erwin

The Vietnam War is famous and we were interested in learning more about it. This museum is very interesting, but also very sad with many horrific photos of the victims of the war. The museum mainly focuses on the war with the Americans with a few things related to the war against the French. The museum has 8 rooms. Outside in a courtyard there are tanks and helicopters and other remnants from the war. 

A word of warning some of the photos in the museum especially of victims of agent orange and napalm are very distressing.

~Irene

If there is one thing I didn't enjoy the most in my travel in Vietnam, that is visiting the War remnant museum. It was really devastating to see the effects of war to people then and now. 

The museum has 3 levels showing pictures during the war. Entrance fee is 15.000 dong, There are memorabilia stores inside the museum but the price here are twice as much than those on Ben Than and Pham Ngu Lao.

~Heydelin

The War Remnants museum is dedicated to the Vietnam War. It gives the full history of the war over three Floors. The museum was previously known as Museum of American War crimes. I thought it handled the war very well and although some of the pictures on the walls were hard to look at the more we understand what happened and hopefully prevent it from happening in the future.

A part of the exhibits were dedicated to press and photographers who were also killed during the war.
Helicopters and armoured trucks are on display outside in the grounds.

Outside the museum people that were affected by the Agent Orange used by the USA during the war sell books and postcards.

OPENING HOURS

7.30-12.00 & 1.30-5.00

~Afly

Sometimes it’s good to know something about a bit of history of the country you are visiting… and so we ended up here in the War Remnants Museum. From the Reunification Palace, you can walk about a few minutes to get here. 

Entrance fee is 2USD; children below 12 yrs old are free. 
Opening hours: Daily at 730-12nn, 130pm-5pm

We got there at 1120am and after buying tickets, one of the staffs said that they’ll be close for lunch at 12nn so we hurried to go inside. We were welcome in the entrance by these big aircrafts and tank. The building has 3 floors, on the ground floor is all about the news of the war, rallies, peace and all that, the 1st floor contains the Agent orange victims (the effect of war against the locals) and the 2nd floor contains the photo contributions of the deceased and missing photographers during the war. 

From the exhibited remnants I saw, I believe that what happened during those times are lessons to be learned. It’s not easy to look back on the very bad situations that took place but when you see the purpose of it, it means that we have to move on and help each other; after all it’s the reason why we are here on earth.

Directions: few minutes walks from Reunification Palace

~The Gaus

This is the FINAL part of the War Remnants Museum tips with more pictures of the third floor pavilions, particularly on the Requiem Pavilion, a compilation of assorted photos. photo montage, iconic photos of the vietnam war by the international photographers, both who lived and died during the war.

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

The Third Level of the Building Houses Historical Truths Pavilion (A room containing photographs, propaganda, news clippings, and signboards geared toward showing the wrongdoings of the U.S. government in the 1960s and 1970s.). Requiem Pavilion (A powerful collection of photographs taken by 134 international journalists who were killed during the Vietnam War),

Vestiges of War Crimes Pavilion (Another room heavily dosed with propaganda showing the mistreatment of civilians during the war) and the Vietnam Post War Recovery Pavilion.

Its exhibits speak for themselves, a distressing compendium of the horrors of modern warfare. Some of the perpetrators of these horrors are on display in the courtyard outside, including a 28-tonne howitzer, a ghoulish collection of bomb parts, and a renovated Douglas Skyraider plane. A series of halls present a grisly portfolio of photographs of mutilation, napalm burns and torture. One gallery details the effects of the 75 million litres of defoliant sprays dumped across the country, including hideously malformed foetuses preserved in pickling jars; another looks at international opposition to the war as well as the American peace movement. The museum rounds off with a grisly mock-up of the tiger cages, the prison cells of Con Son Island.

The museum is effectively a propaganda museum for the Vietnamese Communist regime, as it almost exclusively displays exhibits that are highly critical of the South Vietnamese and American war efforts during the Vietnam War, while neglecting to exhibit anything critical of the North Vietnamese or Viet Cong's war effort or atrocities, for example of the Hue Massacre, the Dak Son Massacre and the Chau Doc massacre, the many land mines scattered across rural southern Vietnam that still lay undentonated often injuring rural villagers (particularly children) today, the brutal treatment of American Prisoners of War (POWs) between 1964 and 1973, and the brutal treatment of political prisoners in labor camps (reeducation camps) run by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during and after the war.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

~Matt

This exhibition is worthwhile when in Ho Chi Minh city. It's very confronting, but a worthy visit. It's about 30,000 dong entry at the door, and opens twice in the day- closed over lunch. Beware of taxis at the front gate who will overcharge you to take you anywhere, opt to walk down the street to get a vinasun or mailinh taxi.

~Melissa

I had read a few reviews before visiting the museum, so was prepared to see some harrowing photos and exhibits. Enjoyable is not the correct word, but the experience was informative and very well presented. If this doesn't make you question War and its implications, then you have no heart or conscience.

~Sonia

Short visit on a Wednesday am with some friends who'd asked to learn a bit more about the history of Saigon/Ho Chi Minh city and Vietnam. 

Whilst there is a little bit of propaganda the majority of the displays are fact based or photo-Journalists record of the war. Not for the faint of heart and not somewhere if personally like to revisit, nonetheless it is a worthwhile visit.

~will

The War Remnants Museum is a horrifying place to visit. The atrocities of a shameful war are on full display here with uncensored photos of carnage and grief. The museum brillantly and sadly gives a full history of the Vietnam War through relics and photo and is laid catergorically floor by floor. The 2nd floor specifically chronicles the atrocities committed by American soldiers during the war and shows a timeline with word and photos of exactly how terrible these events were for the Vietanmese. 

While many people accuse this museum of Communist propaganda and of having extreme bias, I would argue that the events that are shown are a factual reminder of the horrors of war. Every visitor to Vietnam should spend a few hours at this museum as a reminder of the collateral and many time intentional damage that is done to innocent people because of political wars. Its a humbling and sorrowful tribute to the thousands of men, woman, and children that suffered death and injury and whose pains deserve to be remembered. 

Visiting Information

Open Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; the ticketing window closes from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. The last admission to the museum is at 4:30 p.m.

Entrance Cost: 75 cents

Location: 28 Vo Tan Tan, District 3, Ho Chi Minh City
Contact: +84 39302112 or warrmhcm@gmail.com

When to Visit: The War Remnants Museum gets busy in late afternoon as tours to the Cu Chi Tunnels finish there. Avoid the crowds by going earlier in the day.

~Wilo

why Vietnamese have to anti American if they came in peace and went with it

history is mostly written by the winners of the conflict i guess it ,too -but i guess it 's just telling you that American is not the best, not the high-grade being. ^^!

I try to think , there was the war and there is the war remnants, - just go inside watch all of this, then go out and make peace for our world

I just hope that war doesn't repeat itself by any countries (in fact, it 's going on)

~Minh

the war remnants museum is a museum that is a combination of a display of air crafts from the Vietnam war and a display of many pictures and stories from the Vietnam war that focuses on the american war crimes commited in vietnam.
there are also a couple of prison cells from the war that you can see.

I think a lot of boys of all ages will find all the airplanes and helicopters in the courtyard interesting and if you take your time to ge through all the different pictures and stories inside then you can find some really interesting stories among them.

Some americans will probaply say that it´s too anti american and that might be true, but history is mostly written by the winners of the conflict i guess.

~cachasero

The War Remnants Museum in Saigon is an extremely graphic encounter detailing displayed items in all forms the Ten Thousand days that North Vietnam was at war with either South Vietnam ,the French or The USA and its allies..There are many sections to the Museum and can take a few hours to view. Always being interested in Military History, wherever that I may be travelling I always try and view Miltary Museums..this for me was a museum that I wanted to visit as I had heard so much about it...

There are many different sections that touch on all facets of the wars ..with many detailed Maps ,Photos, with a huge collection of various ,Weapons and Ordinance captured or surrendered in the horrific conflict that it was...Outside the building is a large collection of Military Vehicles,Tanks,Artillery and Helicopters that was either left by the departure of The US forces or they were captured by the North Vietnamese Army. 

Photography is allowed inside the Museum and also outside..
The Museum is constantly in a state of reconstruction ,always enlarging and modernising all its activities..

Address: 28 VO VAN TAN DISTRICT 3

Directions: THE MUSEUM IS LOCATED IN DISTRICT 3 IN HO CHI MIN CITY @ #28 VO VAN TAN

OPEN EVERYDAY MORNING TIMES 7.30 -12 MIDDAY

AFTERNOON HOURS: 13.30 - 17.00 LAST VISITOR 16.30

Phone: (84.8)39302112

~Danny

Very salutary visit to a carefully curated series of rooms designed to show US culpability for the war and through this the horrors of the first war to be fought in full media glare. The tribute to the war photographers was particularly moving.

~Tim

After Cu Chi Tunnel, the tour continued to War Remnants Museum. This museum gave you a clearer pictures of how it was like during and after the Vietnam War. It displayed American military hardware, weapons, and helicopter outside of the museum. Inside the museum, it told the truth stories of the war which was different than what the American side of the stories. Americans used nuclear bomb during the war and affected the normal life of the civilians, for example a child was born with one leg, or blinds. It also displayed people from all over the world against the U.S entering the war. Overall, this museum has created a horrify experience for me to learn about the Vietnam War.

~cal

I must say there isn't too many places in the world that I have visited that has made me feel uncomfortable, but this place did ... being an American. I went inside and when I realized it was basically an Anti-American museum I decided to wait outside for my fellow traveler that I was with, and within 15 minutes they had all came out and we all left. The most interesting part of this place are the pieces of military stuff left over that are spread out outside. If your an American be warned you might not like this place !!!!!

~jilian

This museum used to be called the Museum of American War Crimes. I guess it offended a lot of of its US visitors so they had to change. Here you can see hundreds of photographs, torture implements, stories of agent orange and napalm victims, movies about the Vietnam war. It made me really sad why such a useless war like this was waged in the first place.

The top floor has an art center for kids and adults alike to relieve stress by drawing on the free paper and pastels they give out specifically for the purpose of destressing.

~kias

The disturbing War Remnants Museum highlights the horrors of modern combat, and especially portrays the suffering inflicted on the Vietnamese people during the Vietnam War. Previously called the Museum of American War Crimes, the name was altered so as not to cause offence to American visitors, but its displays do tell the story from an anti-American perspective. The museum houses a collection of weapons, machinery, artefacts and horrific photographs illustrating the devastating affects of napalm, Agent Orange and other weapons of mass destruction. One room is dedicated to biological warfare, including the effects of the defoliant sprays that were dumped over the country. Another room looks at worldwide demonstrations for peace and international opposition to the war. In the courtyard there are tanks, helicopters, planes and bombs on display.

~Mig

The War Remnants Museum is in the former U.S. Information Agency building. (Before Vietnam re-established diplomatic ties with the U.S. it was called the War Crimes Museum.) It contains the history of the Vietnam War as told by the winning side, and I didn’t visit every room.

However, the Requiem Exhibit is excellent. It is a collection of photos by photographers, from all sides, who were killed in Viet Nam or Indochina. Pictures and short biographies of the photographers are by their featured photos.

Childrens’s drawings were the most cheerful exhibit in the building. The colorful drawings were in response to a contest for pictures that represented peace.

Assorted tanks and other war machines are on the grounds outside.

Open Tuesday to Sunday

~Ghest

Enjoyed this tour, very graphic in nature but that's to be expected, not long. - 2 hours - and a stroll through mainly pictorial display but one I would highly recommend as its is quite moving

~LeGOAT

The museum begins more light-heartedly showing you the machines and vehicles used in the war in/against Vietnam. It isn't until you enter the museum and make your way around the exhibitions that the chaos that occurred hits you. The museum takes you around in a logical order showing you before, during and aftermath of the war. You will find yourself thinking, more than once, how could one human do this to another. The results of the war and Agent Orange were catastrophic and the effects of the chemical still affect many young people today. 

This is an extremely important sight to visit in Vietnam to understand the point of view of the civilian of the country and to ensure that nothing like this happens again. 

You may want to ensure that you have a tissue to hand, to wipe away a tear.

~Rebecca

Went here as part of a private tour. We were here for 8.30am on a Tuesday morning and it was already heaving with people.

The guide told us to start at the top and work out way down through the 6 rooms, the last is the prison part.

War is an horrific thing and some of the imagery on show here is incredibly unsettling to see. 

It is showcased as more one sided (as expected), especially the war with the US. The conflict between the North & South of Vietnam is also shown here, again with gruesome images.

To say I enjoyed it would be the wrong choice of words. Am I glad I went? Yes but I wouldn't see it again.

~York

I am really glad that we made the stop to visit this museum. Lots of information and excellent photos. I found it very educational and emotional. Take the time at make the visit.

~Garbri

Admission fee is reasonable. You will be given sticker after payment. You will get to know alot of saddening truth here. Good for ppl who love history. Some of the contents not so suitable for young children. Better with guidance. Otherwise they might have nightmare. This is a good place to start your day. Afterwards you can consider gg post office etc... do rmb that they closed for lunch frm 12pm to 130pm.

~jichelong

This museum is a fascinating walk through the horrors that was the Vietnam War. It really helps you appreciate how far Vietnam has come in rebuilding after the senseless devastation caused by the US.

Curiously, the timelines are all in terms of moves made by the USA. I had hoped to learn more about strategic decisions on the Vietnamese side.

~US

I never wanted to go but my friends insisted. I am glad I did. I left the place shedding tears. You would see the other side of the story and you would question a lot of things. An eye opener.

You can buy your ticket on the entrance so you can go straight. However, others have tour guides. I hope I was able to get one. I should have learned more and understood the back stories better. Nevertheless, the visit was all worth it.

~crhis

The war remnants museum is quite interesting and should be on your list, but don't take "facts" too literally.
Many of the exhibits would lead one to think of American invaders of a peaceful country where innocent farmers were slaughtered by brutal foreigners.
It does not mention that the North actually forced itself on a somewhat democratic South. 
However, war is ugly and both sides were guilty of crimes.

This museum shows some of the horrors of war and this is beyond dispute.

~Denis

Hands down the best experience we had in HCMC was at the War Remnants Museum. Having grown up in a country that sent soldiers to this war, but not really knowing a lot about it due to it's suppression, this museum really opened my eyes to what happened. While it is obviously going to be slated towards the Vietnamese experience, it is I thought a better reflection on the war, and really highlights the sadness of this time in history, but also the countries passage towards a better future.

~Ben

Its an interesting but pretty harrowing place. It has a lot of old US Army/Air Force planes and a Chinook helicopter outside and then lots and lots of pretty graphic photos, remnants and information on the inside.

~steve

An easy, but sweaty 15min walk from ruby river hotel. For the dollar entry each, put it on your list to do. A few planes and POW story boards our teenagers got into reading. Also the PR machine from that time. The guillotine was stark and you will meet Vietnamese people who have lost limbs, or blind due to mines etc this was really moving. We were told they did close for lunch, but we went there about 2pm, closes at 4pm. 

~Simon

it is a place for us to get to know what the war did to Vietnam culture. Especially for those who know little about the culture and their relationship with United States, this museum will let you know about the controversial debate on Vietnam war.

~bb

We have two daughters aged 12 and 14 and were unsure of whether this museum would be too confronting. On the top level there is the Dove room that is a self-contained play area for younger children that displays messages of peace, your children can stay here while you visit the rooms. There is also ample seating outside each exhibition room for people to wait if necessary. There are some very graphic and gruesome images that many would find unsuitable for children under the age of 14. 

I strongly urge parental supervision for some exhibits.

It is however a must see to understand the atrocities of war.

~Edkeo

A trip to Vietnam, especially if it's your first one, is incomplete without seeing this museum. May take upto 3h to cover properly so take out enough time and preferably visit first in your traveling day.

~Aruna

Read more Ho Chi Minh City travel guide at here.