National Orchid Garden

Sights Type / Parks & gardens
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
  • National Orchid Garden
Location

Holland Village, Dempsey Hill & the Botanic Gardens, Singapore

Address

1 Cluny Road, Singapore Botanic Gardens, Singapore

Getting there

Bus: 7, 105, 123, 174
Metro: Botanic Gardens

Telephone

+65-6471 7361

Email

nparks_sbg_visitor_services@nparks.gov.sg

More information

https://www.sbg.org.sg, https://facebook.com/NationalOrchidGardenSingapore/

Prices

Adult/child $5/free

Opening hours

Daily: 8:30 am - 7:00 pm

Something wrong?Submit a correction

The National Orchid Garden has one of the largest and most comprehensive orchid displays in Asia. Its attractions include colour-themed orchid displays, a cool house simulating a tropical montane environment, a bromeliad collection, and a specially created hybrids collection named after visiting Heads of State, dignitaries, VIPs, organisations and occasions.

The National Orchid Garden is 3 hectares (7 1/2 acres) of gorgeous orchids growing along landscaped walks. The English Garden features hybrids developed here and named after famous visitors to the garden -- there's the beautifully twisted Margaret Thatcher, the Benazir Bhutto, the Vaclav Havel, and more. The gift shops sell live hydroponic orchids in test tubes for unique souvenirs.

The National Orchid Garden has over 60,000 plants and a cool house showcasing pitcher plants and orchids from cooler climes. Don’t miss the Vanda Miss Joaquim, Singapore’s national flower, which Agnes Joaquim discovered in her garden in 1893.

History

Orchids have been synonymous with the Singapore Botanic Gardens from its establishment in 1859. Records show that orchids were first cultivated in the Gardens in the mid-1870s by Superintendent H. J. Murton. In 1888, Henry Ridley, Director of the Gardens, began an orchid collection programme that resulted in the opening of an Orchid House in 1899. Subsequent directors such as I. H. Burkill and R. E. Holttum further expanded the programme. 

Holttum was instrumental in pioneering the orchid-breeding programme with his creation of the Botanic Gardens’ first hybrid in 1929, the Spathoglottis Primrose (Spathoglottis aurea x Spathoglottis plicata). The orchid-breeding programme has gained momentum and produced award-winning hybrids since then.

In 1988, a grant of S$51 million was awarded to the Singapore Botanic Gardens Redevelopment Masterplan to transform the Gardens into a globally significant equatorial botanic garden within a projected span of 20 years. The Masterplan was drawn up jointly by the National Parks Board, Public Works Department, and Jones & Jones, an American andscape design consultancy based in Seattle, Washington. The plan produced two major site modifications to the Gardens. Firstly, the Napier Road and Bukit Timah portions were integrated, and secondly, the site was configured into a three-core structure: the Tanglin Core, Bukit Timah Core and Central Core. Within the Central Core, a new and enlarged orchid attraction was constructed next to the Palm Valley. 

The new orchid attraction was named the National Orchid Garden after an island-wide, attraction-naming contest that garnered many entries and one student winner. The aim of the NOG was to accommodate the growing orchid collection of the Botanic Gardens and orchid-breeding programme, as well as to relieve congestion caused by the increasing number of visitors (up to 1.5 million visitors a year) to the existing Orchid Enclosure attraction.


TYPES