Menya Hanabi Shinjuku

Restaurants Type / Japanese
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
  • Menya Hanabi Shinjuku
Location

Tokyo, Japan

Address

2-8-16 Okubo | Cosmos Bldg., Shinjuku 169-0072, Tokyo Prefecture, Japan

Getting there

Access: Higashi-Shinjuku Station (Fukutoshin line); Nishi-Waseda Station (Fukutoshin line), exit 3; Shin-Okubo Station (Yamanote line)

Telephone

+81 3-6278-9995

More information

http://menya-hanabi.com/top, https://twitter.com/menya_hanabi

Prices

Meal for two: from around ¥1,600

Opening hours

Tue-Fri 11.30am-2pm, 6pm-9.30pm; Sat-Sun 11am-3pm, 6pm-9pm / closed Mon & the 2nd and 4th Tue of every month

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The outside of this ramen-ya is decorated like a box of firecrackers, but the real fireworks take place in the kitchen. Make your selection at the ticket machine and take your place at the brightly-lit L-shaped counter for a bowl of maze-soba (soupless ramen, ¥780) topped with raw egg yolk, a spicy mince of pork and beef, spring onions, matchsticks of nori, powdered dried fish, and chopped raw garlic (set the latter ingredient aside unless you're dating a vampire later). The many custom versions include an additional chashu pork topping, but we found enough meat in the standard version. Stir up the nicely textured wheat noodles to a gloopy mix and eat your fill. The queue attests to the popularity of this branch of a shop that started life in Nagoya; arrive before the opening time of 6pm, or be prepared to stand in line for half an hour.

Ranked as No.35 in Japan is Hanabi in Shinjuku. It is one branch of ramen restaurant chain based in Nagoya. It offers original menu, Taiwan mazesoba. Though the name is topped with Taiwan, it’s based on spicy Taiwan ramen originated in Nagoya area not Taiwan. Mazesoba is not served with typical soup but with tangy sauce, spicy minced meat and other toppings. Thick noodles twine well with thick sauce. Various arranged menu are also popular among regulars.

Menya Hanabi Shinjuku Shop Reviews

As other reviews precise, this a locally famous place for its Taiwanese style dried noodle. Went there solo after work, and it was crowded although it was only 18:30,on a weekday, and there is nothing else in that Street. People do come only for the restaurant. The noodles are truly great. The savor and the aroma of the meat mixed together are truly a great combination. It is the perfect level and type of spiciness.

In order to help non-Japanese guests, here is how you eat it:
1) first, mix everything well. The dish is called "mazesoba ", basically noodles to mix. 
2) once you've eaten around of the 2/3,add a little of the home made vinegar and enjoy the change of savor. I really loved it. 

3) when noodles are finished, ask the cooks for some rice "Ooi nushi". You don't need to talk, and they would understand if you just give them your bowl. Then, you can mix the rice with the sauce, and enjoy the flavour until the end. To be honest, I never had the Taiwanese version and I felt that it was pretty Japanese.~monviard

This Ramen shop specialized for the Taiwanese dry noodle which contained spicy minced pork. There were a queue of 6 people when I visited there, but usually there were always long long queues whole day. Menu were dry noodle and Ramen style soup noodle. I highly recommended dry noodle, because it was famous for a dry one. I felt very strong impression with its taste. Spicy, garlic flavor and egg york texture. The price was affordable. Maze soba which was the most popular menu was only 780 yen. It was worthy to visit.~matt

My Japanese friends took me there! We walked for over 20mins from Shinjuku station in summer and then were waiting in a line for 30 mins. The store severs ice water outside. It cooled me down, otherwise, I will die.The noodles are so chewed and so tasty! A little spicy. The meats are soft! I love it so much even I don't know why it called Taiwanese noodles.However, the location is not perfect. It would be better to be closer to Shinjuku station.~sharon

Despite of being 10+ min walk from 3 stations (Fukutoshin line and JR), lots of people congregate here and queue up. I waited for about an hour for Sunday lunch, it can be brutal if you come here during the summer or middle of winter. So, plan well.This "Maze soba"('stirring' soba) is supposedly Taiwanese dish but quite common in Nagoya, according to the sign.As far as texture goes, if you think of fettuccine Alfredo or Carbonara, you're right on that line. 

And it was little spicy. Little spicy that tingles your tongue. Sauce is quite thick and especially after breaking that raw egg and stirring well.As said, this isn't the place where you can come spontaneously. Plan well and come w/ your friends so that waiting wouldn't feel so long.~jimmy

In a post last week, I mention that Taiwanese mazemen, or “mixed noodles”, are all the rage in Japan. I ran the pic you see above in that post and everyone wanted to know here it was from. Well, that would be Menya Hanabi in Tokyo

Having gotten their start in Nagoya, Hanabi is now also one of the most popular places in Tokyo after being named the best mazemen shop in the city by several respected magazines and blogs, and being featured on a few TV news programs. This line of about 15 people is on the shorter side, actually; this was at about 1pm in the afternoon, after the post-lunch rush. Yet we still had to wait about 45 minutes to get in. 

Hanabi operates just like any other ramen shop: you order and pay through the vending machine at the entrance, get your ticket and sit down at the ten-seat counter that looks into their open kitchen…Within a few minutes, your order is placed in front of you…Taiwanese mazemen is a brothless bowl of noodles traditionally topped with a spicy mixture of minced pork & beef, scallions and a raw egg…Individual shops then personalize their bowls with a variety of other additions. Hanabi has become known for making there’s extra hot by adding in garlic and Szechuan pepper…We ordered ours with chunks of roast pork as well…You then stick your chopsticks in an mix it all up…You then slurp just like ramen! Lovely, isn’t it?!

Hanabi’s also become popular for the service they offer after you finish your noodles, which is why their wait times are a little longer. You see, rather than let all that eggy and porky soup that builds up in the bottom of your bowl go to waste, the fine folks at Hanabi scoop in rice for you to soak it up…It’s a like a second course…A taste of Taiwan in Tokyo that is so worth the wait!~andrei