Sushi Saito

Restaurants Type / Sushi & Sashimi
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Location

Tokyo, Japan

Address

1st Floor, Ark Hills South Tower, 1-4-5 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo

Getting there

Nearest station: Roppongi Itchome (60 meters from Roppongi Itchome)

Telephone

+81 3-3589-4412

More information

https://web.facebook.com/pages/Sushi-Saito/, https://foursquare.com/v/sushi-saito, https://www.yelp.com/biz/sushi-saito-yelp

Prices

Sushi Saito price:

Average cost for lunch : 10,000yen per person
Average cost for dinner : 25,000yen per person

Opening hours

Lunch: 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Dinner: 5:00 pm - 11:00 pm

*Closed on Sundays and public holidays.

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For this upcoming cherry blossom season, restaurant reservations are impossible to come by: especially at top-notch dining places where exclusively reserved seats are only available through Voyagin. They can also get their foot-in-the-door for you at Sushi Saito for your well-deserved savory fare. Sushi Saito in Roppongi, Tokyo, is one of Japan's best known sushi restaurants with a Michelin 3-star rating. The dinner prepared here by Chef Takashi Saito cannot be compared to anything else! CNN Travel described Sushi Saito as a "hidden gem", and it is also included every year in the prestigious list of Asia's 50 Best Restaurants. 

Sushi Saito has only 8 seats. The great popularity of this exquisite restaurant and the limited number of seats require mandatory prior reservation which is very difficult to make. Our service will help you book seats at Sushi Saito and relish the first-rate taste of carefully prepared sushi with fresh seafood!Sushi Saito left its unlikely home in a car park last year for more conventional premises at the Ark Hills development in Tokyo's Roppongi district. Located on the first floor of the South Tower, the minimalist dining room seats eight people perched at the wooden counter, where chef Takashi Saito and his team quietly work their magic.

The tiny space and the restaurant's lofty reputation (Joël Robuchon has described it as the “best sushi restaurant in the world”) means securing seats is something of a challenge. Those lucky enough to bag a spot have the pleasure of tasting a flight of sushi dishes that perfectly balance texture and flavour, from aji (mackerel) with grated ginger and negi (onion) to sea urchin and clam.Saito's signature style uses slightly smaller cuts of fish and a touch more salt in the rice, while wasabi, soy or lemon is applied to the fish before being served.

Sushi Saito Reservation

Sushi Saito has only 8 seats. The great popularity of this exquisite restaurant and the limited number of seats require mandatory prior reservation which is very difficult to make. Our service will help you book seats at Sushi Saito and relish the first-rate taste of carefully prepared sushi with fresh seafood!
Sushi Saito is open Monday to Saturdays under the following schedule:
Lunch 11:00~14:00
Dinner 17:00~23:00
Average cost for lunch : 10,000yen per person 
Average cost for dinner : 25,000yen per person
*Closed on Sundays and public holidays.

Sushi Saito Tokyo Review

When you sit at  a 7 places sushi counter, you will most likely end up making conversations with your neighbours. My neighbours at  Sushi Saito ( Jidousha kaikan Bldg. F1, 1-9-15 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo,tel. 03-3589-4412 ) – a nice Japanese couple who comes to this sushi bar regularly and who also spends their summer holidays in the South of France. We spoke about sushi,fish in Japan,in France and  " why don't Europeans like their fish"  as they "overcook it and cover in sauces","so you can't even see which fish you are eating". This point of view was particularly interesting as somehow it's true.The philosophy of Japanese cuisine is the complete opposite. It is all about respecting  ingredients and instead of overcooking them, emphasising their freshness and natural texture.
Takashi Saito is just 39 years old, but already runs one of the best sushiyas in Tokyo. He used to work at Kyubei, now he stands behind the sushi counter of his 3 Michelin starred,  pocket sized restaurant, located in  a garage in front of the American Embassy. What makes Sushi Saito so special? The "mind blowing" quality of the fish;  the fact that every morsel of the fish is served at a certain temperature; or that some of the fish is "aged", so all it's best flavors are brought out.( This pushes the Edo-mae sushi method even further.)
Most of all, Takashi Saito is known for being outgoing and friendly with his guests. You can even order champagne or wine with your meal- I have never seen that before at any other traditional sushi restaurant in Tokyo.
~anne

“2-3 years ago it used to be so easy to get into Saito. Sometimes you could just go in for lunch without any reservations.”
I heard this lament more than once from my friend, an old Saito regular. The rules have, of course, changed permanently. Saito is now canonized as one of the top 2-3 sushi places in Tokyo, if not as the very best of them all. Reservations (sushi saito reservation) are made 4 months out even for erstwhile regulars, and it is almost impossible to get a reservation if you are not a regular. It started perhaps with the Michelin (sushi saito michelin) guide’s seal of approval, and was exacerbated in the last couple of years with a weak yen luring more gastro-tourists into the country.
In the midst of this media attention, Saito seems to remain fairly normal. He plans to focus on his Tokyo branch, but will open a branch in Malaysia early next year, at the new St Regis hotel in Kuala Lumpur Sentral.
Does the sushi live up to its reputation? I can say Saito’s sushi is the best I’ve tried in Tokyo so far:

He makes incredible rice. What will stick with me above all is Saito’s sense of balance – his rice has the perfect temperature (warm), texture (soft but distintegrates unobstrusively in the first two bites) and taste (perfect conveyance for a salty vinegar). I found it comforting to eat each piece – the rice just ever-so-warm and perfectly vinegary, providing a foil for the topping.
He elevates not just the luxury cuts but the common cuts too – Several specimens were brought to a level of perfection I had not experienced before. The luxury cuts (tuna, nodoguro, kinmedai) were all top-class, but these are ingredients which can be bought by any chef. The test of skill is to elevate the more difficult cuts. I thought I had many eye-opening morsels. The iwashi (sardine) was one of many highlights – a cheap and common fish raised to a sublime level of melting perfection. The octopus had a magical contrast of textures. And Saito’s hand-dexterity was evident when he made an uni nigiri, which I have never seen before.
I also enjoyed that the atmosphere was relaxed and easy, without any of the tiresome hushed reverence. Reverence is suited for a pilgrimage, but a pilgrimage is a one-off. Hopefully I’ll be back at Saito before long.

Evaluating sushi. I came skeptical of high-end sushi because the possibilities for composition seem limited. I was disappointed by experiences at Mizutani and Hashiguchi because I expected more creativity and intense flavors. But I think I had the wrong critical lenses. Sushi is a parade of perfect morsels, and when you eat it a thousand times you become familiar with a thousand references and appreciate sterling examples of the craft. For me, it seems enjoying a sushi meal is about paying attention the micro-factors of balance, seasoning, preparation, and ignoring the macro-factors of dish composition where a sushi chef’s hands are tied.
Standout cuts: Octopus, Nodoguro, Tuna (akami, chutoro, otoro), Iwashi (sardine) nigiri, Anago (sea eel) nigiri, Murasaki uni nigiri

What I found amazing was the texture of octopus – the outer “skin” was soft and jelly-like, where the inner core of the tentacle was meaty – like two different materials had come together. It takes so much ingenuity to make octopus delicious, this octopus was one of the best-examples I’ve had
Nice balance between scallions and ginger, a good contrast of jelly and sear
Ultra-rare, and with a dry minerality. A perfect complement to Saito’s sushi, and possibly the best pairing sake on the menu
The meat had little resistance, the skin had a delicious seared taste.
There can be no faulting perfection. From a 200kg tuna caught from the cold waters of Oma
The strong taste of sardine was evident in the first bite, but how smooth the fish was! It was like silk, going down the mouth, paired with a little dab of ginger. The freshness was unparalleled. The rice, a vinegary ephemeral cloud, a kiss of love towards the star of the show, the unheralded sardine – usually so tough when canned, but here with the grace of the best cuts. The standout piece from today’s meal.
One thing special about Saito is that he folds the prawn-head innards just under the rice.
This marks a first – I had never seen uni used as nigiri. The tongues are soft and liable to fall apart, and testament to Saito’s dexterity. Cold, and a good contrast with the rice.
Typically paired with sweet sauce, here Saito applied dabs of salt (and sudachi lime?) which was equally delicious.
~mark

There are many fantastic sushi restaurants in Tokyo. It is impressive how many they are and their top level. Common to them all is that they are small, but none of the top sushi shops in Tokyo is smaller than Sushi Saito. As a matter of fact the restaurant is the smallest top rated in the world. Just seven seats tucked in quite close to each other and not even a rest room in the restaurant. You have to leave the restaurant and use a nearby public rest room if nature calls you.
Chef Patron Takashi Saito is among the younger master sushi chefs in Japan and was born in 1972. Saito-san got most of his training and perfected his skills at the famous Kyubei restaurant before he established his own shop. He has got an extrovert attitude and is attentive to all his guests so you will really feel selected in the master’s presence. It is not usual that any of the greatest chefs in Japan speak any English, but Saito will actually talk to you in some English and it is enough for any Westerner to feel welcome.

Sushi Saito is located in Akasaka just next to the American Embassy in the Nihon Jitensha Kaikan building, but you will have to look closely for the red curtains at the entrance of the tiny restaurant to find it. Once you have arrived to the restaurant you will find the atmosphere to be relaxed and enjoyable. Saito welcomes everyone as if they were regulars to him and you will probably soon end up in chats with the other guests who sit close to you so get ready for some interaction with both the Chef and the guests even if you do not speak Japanese.

Of course a lot of Saito’s cuisine is about sushi in all its forms, but during dinner service you will also have more elaborate dishes more like kaiseki. It is only sushi at lunch time and the fare is one of the best values for money in Tokyo at this top level, but the dinner quote is pretty much the same as for other top sushi restaurants in Japan. It costs some significant money, but you will have the best sushi available.
Chef Saito keeps his rice warm, but it is of course served at room temperature when it arrives in front of you with the best imaginable seafood on top of it. It is very impressive to watch the Chef work and how he measures the exact right amount of rice to each piece he serves you. He is extremely skilled with his fingers and each piece of nigiri is perfectly made every time. Sushi Saito is one of the best sushi restaurants in the world and a must for everyone visiting Tokyo.
~michael

Now located on the first floor of the Ark Hills South Tower after moving from Akasaka, Saito is perhaps Tokyo's most highly-rated sushi joint right now – and yes, that's including Sukiyabashi Jiro. With counter seating and an owner who keeps a keen eye on each of his customers to serve up sushi with perfect timing, the restaurant is a clear favourite of Michelin (sushi saito michelin) director-general Jean-Luc Naret, who was quoted as saying that he ‘wanted to make this place my own’.
~david

Sushi Saito ranks in the tops of my favourite meals in my lifetime so far, alongside L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon in Taipei and Restaurant Gordon Ramsay in London. Sushi Saito is a three Michelin star (sushi saito michelin) Japanese cuisine restaurant known for its sushi. It is quite hard to locate, hence I have attached a map below. It is in a very unassuming building right opposite the American Embassy, but the hunt is worth it!
Unfortunately, because this meal is >2 years ago, I cannot remember all the details of the dishes, but the freshness of the seafood and their perfect balance with the amount of rice lingers in my mind till today. There were 2 lunch sets – 12 pieces or 18 pieces. You only pick the number of pieces and not the individual type of sushi.
Ok, and wait for this…… this tuna belly was so fatty and soft, it tasted almost like red meat. AMAZING. I still remember how it tasted till today after >2 years!
Moving onto other seafood, with natural sweetness and zingyness..
MUST TRY!! But try to book 2-3 months in advance, and you will probably need a Japanese friend to book, as well as direct you to the restaurant eventually.
You can make a reservation (sushi saito reservation) for Sushi Saito here =)
Here are also other links that you may find useful.
Things to do in Japan – here
Restaurant Reservation Service in Tokyo: here

Sushi Saito
Address: 1 Chome-9-15 Akasaka, Minato, Tokyo 107-0052, Japan (Directly across from the US embassy)
Hours: Wednesday 11:30 am – 2:00 pm, 5:00–10:00 pm
Tel: +81 3-3589-4412 (You have to speak Japanese for reservations)
~steve

Few sushi masters are held in higher esteem in Tokyo than Takashi Saito. His triple-Michelin-star status is testament to his skill and his nigiri sushi is second to none. But what sets his intimate nine-seat counter restaurant above the others is that it feels so comfortable and relaxed. Needless to say, reservations are at a premium, and he is booked solid for months ahead. [$$$$]
~angela

Takashi Saito is the chef/owner of Sushi Saito, a restaurant located inside a car park, yet with three Michelin stars.  At the time of writing it is the highest rated sushi restaurant in Tokyo on Tabelog, the kanji-only Japanese restaurant guide, which is a sort of constantly updated version of Zagat. Mr Saito trained principally at Kyubei before striking out on his own. The restaurant is tiny, seating either seven or eight people at full capacity along the little counter. It is in a surreal location. Opposite the American embassy is a multi-storey car park; you enter the car park up the ramp, and on the right is a little door. Behind this is a red curtain, the threshold to Sushi Saito. The chef applies  freshly grated wasabi, soy or lemon to each piece of sushi as appropriate; the only condiment that the diners have is pickled ginger, which had terrific flavour.
At lunch you can choose from sushi menus of 10, 15 or 18 pieces, or opt for the dinner menu, which goes beyond purely sushi. We tried the 15 piece menu today. The meal began with red snapper, then iroeti (there didn't seem to be an English translation). Shad has a taste reminiscent of sardine, and was excellent.

Next came the traditional trio of tuna: maguro, chu-toro and otoro, which were velvety smooth in texture and tasted superb. Squid sushi is remarkable here, as tender as I remembered it from the first visit. A cooked prawn was followed by baby shrimp sushi, both excellent, the baby shrimp a little taste of the sea. Bonito was magnificent, the best I have tried, followed by lovely sweet baby scallops in a seaweed roll. There are two types of uni (sea urchin) served here, one quite sweet, one more briny, both top drawer. Eel was served with and without sauce. The sequence concluded with rolls of a Japanese vegetable which had no English translation.
Mr Saito speaks quite good English and is very friendly, chatting and joking with the customers. There is no sense of hushed formality, the atmosphere very relaxed. The bill at lunch, with water only to drink, came to ¥10,500 (£69), so not only is it the best sushi in Tokyo, it is the cheapest of the top places. 
~peter

Sushi Saito is a small, clean, cheerful sushi restaurant presided over by the charming owner-chef, Saito-san.
Sushi Saito is located in the Akasaka/Roppongi district of Tokyo in the Ark Hills South Tower development.
Sushi Saito was previously located just across from the US Embassy but moved in 2014.
Sushi Saito is open at both lunchtime and in the evening. For lunch you can order any sushi you like, but Saito Sushi has three recommended lunch sets for 5,000 yen (10 pieces of sushi), 10,000 yen (15 pieces of sushi), and 15,000 yen (18 pieces of sushi).
While everything at Saito Sushi tastes great, the tuna (akami, chu-toro, and oh-toro), shiraebi (Japanese glass shrimp), anago (conger eel) and uni (sea urchin) deserve special mention.
All in all, Sushi Saito co-stars on the Tokyo sushi stage with Sushi Mizutani.
~miley

It seems that there are two schools of thought when it comes to the art of sushi making. A number of masters like Jiro and his proteges stick with a more vinegary taste to the rice, which apparently is the traditional way, whereas others opt for a milder taste that most palates are familiar with. Shin falls under the first category. And he does it brilliantly too. The full omakase experience was very pleasant. Some dishes that stood out were the horse mackerel nigiri (on which he doesn't use pure ginger on top as is usually the case), smoked mackerel sashimi, and the uni nigiri (he uses two types of uni). The first time, a full omakase set is recommended. When I'm there next though, I'll pick a pure nigiri omakase instead.~roger

I could not rate this host more highly. Even though my host could not get me a reservation (sushi saito reservation) at Sushi Saito, she was very helpful in proposing alternatives, allocating specific times to make the reservations, sending reminders, and was in general, very responsive.She managed to get us a reservation at Sukiyabashi Jiro (Roppongi) at the time and date we required, and I could not rate her responsiveness, initiative and communication skills more highly.~lan

Takashi Saito is the chef/owner of Sushi Saito, a restaurant located inside a car park, yet with three Michelin stars.  At the time of writing it is the highest rated sushi restaurant in Tokyo on Tabelog, the kanji-only Japanese restaurant guide, which is a sort of constantly updated version of Zagat. Mr Saito trained principally at Kyubei before striking out on his own. The restaurant is tiny, seating either seven or eight people at full capacity along the little counter. It is in a surreal location. Opposite the American embassy is a multi-storey car park; you enter the car park up the ramp, and on the right is a little door. Behind this is a red curtain, the threshold to Sushi Saito. The chef applies  freshly grated wasabi, soy or lemon to each piece of sushi as appropriate; the only condiment that the diners have is pickled ginger, which had terrific flavour

At lunch you can choose from sushi menus of 10, 15 or 18 pieces, or opt for the dinner menu, which goes beyond purely sushi. We tried the 15 piece menu today. The meal began with red snapper, then iroeti (there didn't seem to be an English translation). Shad has a taste reminiscent of sardine, and was excellent.

Next came the traditional trio of tuna: maguro, chu-toro and otoro, which were velvety smooth in texture and tasted superb. Squid sushi is remarkable here, as tender as I remembered it from the first visit. A cooked prawn was followed by baby shrimp sushi, both excellent, the baby shrimp a little taste of the sea. Bonito was magnificent, the best I have tried, followed by lovely sweet baby scallops in a seaweed roll. There are two types of uni (sea urchin) served here, one quite sweet, one more briny, both top drawer. Eel was served with and without sauce. The sequence concluded with rolls of a Japanese vegetable which had no English translation.

Mr Saito speaks quite good English and is very friendly, chatting and joking with the customers. There is no sense of hushed formality, the atmosphere very relaxed. The bill at lunch, with water only to drink, came to ¥10,500 (£69), so not only is it the best sushi in Tokyo, it is the cheapest of the top places. ~andy

This is the holy grail of sushi restaurants in Tokyo. Numero uno! Takashi Saito has perfected his trade and gets incredible fish from Tsukiji. His rice is meant to complement the tuna and there is a perfect match. Reservations (sushi saito reservation), unfortunately are hard to come by.~takeshi

Without a Doubt Sushi Saito is The worlds Absolute unequivocal Best , it doesn't matter how high your expectations are set At Saito's it will be Exceedingly met.Every single Sushi brought forward were of an extraordinary proportion , meticulously Crafted and presented .With The Ambience being the cherry on the top , it was warm and friendly , in a nutshell it was an unprecedented experience , I was in Sushi Heaven .~lim

Recommended by a local friend I took a couple of clients here and we were blown away. It's a traditional joint where you sit right in front of the preparation area - only enough space for 9 - and they prepare each tasty morsel before your eyes. Only question was 'is there anything you don't eat?' We all said no with some trepidation, but it was great as it forced us to eat things we might not otherwise tried. The regulars are there but we also had fluke, eel, clam, roe, crab, &sea urchin! And we liked them all!Service impeccable, but it's not cheap ~£400 for 3 people without booze. Well worth it though.~bear

I was invited by a frequent customer, which one has to practically be to get a reservation (sushi saito reservation) here. This is one of the most difficult places in which to get a seat. There are 9 seats at a counter and the place takes reservations from 6pm and 8pm. If you want to take your time enjoying the great food and atmosphere, get the later time. Most regular customers end their meals by getting their next reservation.This is an experience not to be missed. Mr. Saito is so dedicated, he sleeps four hours a night. That and a lot of creativity are what it takes to win 3 Michelin stars. Everything is perfect. Even the miso soup is a work of art. I paid 26000 yen which is modest for a place like this. Expect to pay more if you book a 8pm time and eat more or order expensive drinks.~lee

Sushi Saito got Michelin  (sushi saito michelin) 3 star 2015. Very polished elegant small Shishi restaurant. only 8 sheet and extremely difficult to get table but it will worth to wait for your table even more than 6 month you need to wait. Service, atmosphere and chef's wonderful skill. All Tuna Nigiri (i had Zuke, Akami and Fat tuna) was fantastic, perfect balance and temperature. Great experience to go there. English speaking staff available. if you live out of Japan you should book the restaurant before your flight ticket. high recommend.~mitsu

You start to smile with your whole body. No words are necessary. I want more, I want more. Great variety.Every dish is its own piece of art
Saitos energy fills the whole room, and doubles the experience.and a great relaxed atmosphere, none of the strict rules of how to behave, you might find in other places.~peter

if you noticed restaurants in Japan are not much in TripAdvisor for unknown reason ,,,but this sushi is way better then Jiro i've been to 2 both of them ! Jiro is a legend yet but this is way better !!!!~spoo