Inokashira Park

Sights Type / Parks & gardens
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
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  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
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  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
  • Inokashira Park
Location

Tokyo, Japan

Address

Gotenyama~Kichijoji Minamicho, Musashino-shi & Inokashira~Shimorenjaku~Mure, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo, Japan

Getting there

Access

Kichijoji Station (Chuo, Keio Inokashira lines), park exit then 10mins walk.

Telephone

+81 422-47-6900

Fax

+81-422-47-9371

More information

http://www.tokyo-park.or.jp/park/format/index044.html, http://www.kensetsu.metro.tokyo.jp/seibuk/inokashira/index.html, https://web.facebook.com/pg/Inokashira-Park, https://foursquare.com/v/inokashira-park/, https://web.facebook.com/pages/Inokashira-Park/

Prices

Free admission. Swan boat: 700yen per 30 min.

Opening hours

24 hours

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Inokashira Park, established in 1917, will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2017. Originally considered a park in the suburbs, Inokashira Park now serves as a precious green space for the adjacent residential area. Best time to visit Inokashira Park between from MarchLate to April Early.

Located just 15 minutes from the centre of Tokyo, this Kichijoji park has more than enough to occupy you for an afternoon, including a zoo, a pond with amusingly shaped rental boats, and playground facilities to keep the little ones happy. The south side is home to the Studio Ghibli museum – a must-visit for anime fans – and at weekends the park comes alive with street traders, musicians and artists. In late March and early April it fills with people enjoying hanami (cherry-blossom viewing), and it’s worth making the trip to join them.

The third Tokugawa shogun, Iemitsu, is said to have given Inokashira Pond its name. The name is said to mean either “source of the water supply” or “well that supplies the most delicious water.” The Inokashira Pond was the source of the first water service for the city of Edo, the Kanda water supply. The water for this pond was used as drinking water until an improved water supply was completed in 1898.

The park is divided into four sections: Inokashira Pond and its surroundings, Gotenyama that contains a wooded area and the Shizen Bunka-en Gardens, recreation facilities in the wet portion of the park, and the No. 2 park to the southeast. The landscape is full of variety, with the lowlands of Inokashira Pond and the highlands of Gotenyama.

Opened: May 1, 1917
Area: 428,000 m2 (some areas are state-owned property provided under gratuitous loan)
Trees: Tall trees: 10,700, shrubs: 16,200 m2, grass: 18,600 m2
Main plants: Carpinus tschonoskii, acer palmatum, cherry (someiyoshino), sawara cypress, hinoki cypress, camellia
Facilities: Boat dock, athletic field, tennis courts, outdoor stage,a baseball field

What to explore at Inokashira Park?

You can ride the Swan boats on the lake. It is a chance to admire the fascinating sightseeing of the park on the lake.

You can take your children to go to the Inokashira Park Zoo. There are many animals in the zoo where you can enjoy beautiful plumage of ducks, geese, swans, and cranes and so on.

Fortunately, you can watch some free shows. The artists at Inokashira Park are unique because most of them do ask for money (or either have a hat where you can donate or purchase one of their CDs).

Moreover, you can visit the Benzaiten shrine. It’s a beautiful, vivid red that looks especially breathtaking during the cherry blossom season. Aside from housing an apparently jealous or vengeful spirit, it is a great place to stop and relax for a bit.

The ducks are a lot cuter than the fish and, if you’re on the boats, a mob of them will follow you around the lake. You can try feeding them.

Access

By car: Approx. 20 min. from Chofu IC
From Haneda Airport:**
From Shinjuku: JR Chuo Line Kichijoji Station
From Shibuya: Keio Inokashira Line Kichijoji Station/Inokashira-koen Station
By train:
- 5 minutes by foot from Kichijoji Station on the JR Chuo Line/Keio Inokashira Line
- 1 minute by foot from Inokashira-koen Station on the Keio Inokashira Line
By bus:Take the Odakyu Bus and get off at the Koen-iriguchi/Bunkaen-mae bus stop

Reviews by visitors

The mascot of Inokashira Park Zoo is a squirrel, so to be completely honest, you shouldn’t really be expecting much in terms of animal variety. However, at 400yen for a passport-less adult (with a passport, foreigners get a 20% discount), the park was well worth it. Inokashira Park Zoo is famous in Japan for specializing in the indigenous creatures of Japan, so along with the typical monkeys and elephants, there are also several species of uniquely Japanese animals.

The park itself (as I later learned) was split into two sections, the first that housed an assortment of ducks, and the second that housed all the other animals, including Hanako, the giant Thai elephant. However, by far what makes the Inokashira Park Zoo unique is the fact that the two parks are separated. It is two for the price of one. It is impossible to buy a ticket to just one of the parks.

The first park is essentially a duck sanctuary. As mentioned before,

Inokashira Park Zoo specializes in the indigenous species of Japan – especially squirrels and ducks- and is devoted to breeding those mandarin ducks and releasing them into the wild.  More specifically, they release the ducks into the pond next door, the pond we talked about in an earlier post where you can rent a boat (a row-boat, a boat shaped like a swan, or a regular paddle boat). So unfortunately this section of the Inokashira Park Zoo looked a lot like the free version, right next door.

Inokashira Park has always been an important place for Tokyoites. Located west of the city’s center on the JR Chuo Line, it is a source of art, culture and, crucially, water.  

The park is reputed to have gotten its name, which literally means wellspring or well head, from the 3rd shogun, Tokugawa Iemitsu (grandson of Tokugawa Ieyasu), who chose Edo as his capital in 1590. Ieyasu himself is said to have used water from the spring called Ochanomizu (tea water) on the pond’s western edge for his tea ceremony, and waters from this area formed the man-made Kanda water supply, which fed Edo for more than two centuries until more modern supply systems were completed in 1898. 

In 2017 Inokashira Park will celebrate the centenary of being given to the people as a gift from Emperor Taisho in 1917. The park is worth visiting for several reasons. Amid tall trees and wandering paths a sizeable pond, home to large koi (carp), ducks and other forms of life, is the defining feature, and small rowboats and paddle boats can be rented to set out upon it. But be warned: There is an oft-repeated saying in Japanese to the effect that couples who venture forth in boats at this park will surely break up soon. 

This green space is also famous for hanami, or the viewing of plum and cherry blossoms in spring, when it absolutely teems with visitors. But forget about the boats and the blossoms, and set the park’s modest zoo aside. The real appeal of Inokashira lies in its lesser-known gems.

The first of these is the Inokashira Park Art Mart, a glorious and motley collection of artists that congregate along the paths each weekend, rain or shine, to display (and often sell) their myriad talents. 

The work of the quieter ones speaks for itself and includes crafts, jewelry such as necklaces and beadwork, paintings, portraits and much more, though not every visual artist is there to sell.

But there is busking as well, live shows of magic and other physical feats. Of particular note is a fellow named Rikimaru Toho, a kind of verbal animator who for a small fee will read large-print manga comics aloud in a host of voices.

Also worth looking out for, though by no means hard to spot, is Broom Duster Kan, an elderly chap who sings rockabilly, rhythm and blues and just plain blues while self-accompanying simultaneously on steel guitar and sometimes harmonica. He wears a portable speaker on his hip, strides around as he plays and otherwise gives the impression that he’s the soul of the park. 

For those on their way to the fantastic Ghibli Museum, rather than exiting at Mitaka Station, try getting off at Kichijoji Station and walking through to the park’s southwestern corner, where this wonderland of animation can be found. Visitors take note – tickets are needed, often bought as in advance as possible, owing to the ubiquitous popularity of this studio’s characters and films.

The second of Inokashira’s subtle draws is the presence of a few excellent shops so dug in as to be nearly inconspicuous. Pepa Cafe Forest is the most visible, set a bit into the trees on the southern shore of the pond. It does Thai and fusion cuisine, sells a few beers and has a patio that affords generous elbow room. 

Off the western shore is Café du Lièvre, a hare-themed cozy little space that serves galettes (buckwheat crepes, both meals and deserts), soups, drinks, and other French fare. 

Though slightly harder to find, an apparently nameless and rather ramshackle shop that manages to stand among the trees is a source of truly high-grade coffee that’s freshly made and ground, and topped with the “latte art” sometimes seen in social media photos. This excellent little shack has become quite popular among parkgoers, and as the coffee is take-out only, many people stop by for a cup to enrich their stroll. There are other shops too, meaning thorough exploration will be rewarded.

Another of Inokashira’s salient features is a shrine for the Buddhist goddess Benzaiten, who is Indian in origin but also recognized by Japan’s native Shinto religion. Benzaiten is the gestalt of Inokashira personified, or rather deified: She is the patroness of rivers and water, language and knowledge, wealth and good fortune, as well as music and poetry, among others.   

The small shrine grounds are even home to the grindstone Tokugawa Ieyasu used to make his tea, and if you stand just before the bridge, you can still see a fading likeness to the scene that famed woodblock artist Utagawa Hiroshige did of the site back in 1845.

Access: Five-minute walk from Kichijoji Station on the JR Chuo and Keio-Inokashira lines, or a one-minute walk from Inokashira-koen Station on the Inokashira Line.

~andrew

Inokashira Park is quiet most of the year, only hosting a couple of outdoor festivals annually as well as a beautiful hanami (cherry blossom blooming) in the spring.  The park was a gift from the Emperor to the city of Tokyo around 1913, park opened in 1918.  

The beautiful pond, Inokashira pond, is part of the Kanda River water source that flows through the entirety of Tokyo.   There are swan and duck boats rentals to take a turn around the pond, also some scenic bridges crossing the lake at narrow points.  A small zoo is inside the park with a separate inside entrance.  There is also a very beautiful and peaceful shrine inside the park complex and along the edge of the lake, dedicated specifically to Benzaiten, a Japanese Buddhist goddess.
At each end of the park, there are snacking and dining options, as well as at the train stations.  
The park is halfway between Kichijoji and Mitaka station.  

Inside the park, directional signs are clearly labeled in Japanese, English, and Korean for tourists and locals alike.  If you are visiting Studio Ghibli Museum, I definitely recommend arriving early in the morning to walk around Inokashira Park before heading to the museum.  Or packing your lunch and coming for a picnic near the lake.  
When we visited, we saw many children on field trips, joggers, families, and were even approached by locals speaking Japanese to us.  We do not speak Japanese well, but were able to communicate just fine and have fun in the process.  Inokashira Park is a beautiful scenic place, in a great neighborhood full of friendly people.

~cotsy

Highly recommend during cherry blossom season to come here and paddleboat. It was such a serene experience. My sister and I came here 2 years ago during sakura blooming week, and rented a swan paddleboat and had a blast. If you have long legs, I do not recommend you to do the paddling on this particular swan paddleboat. Other than that, it is a work out but worth it. Super fun!!

Afterwards, go walk around the park and grab an ice cream or beverage at one of the kiosk.

~sandra

One of Tokyo's famous parks for viewing cherry blossoms in the spring, Inokashira Park is just big enough to feel like a (sub)urban oasis, yet the ample shops and restaurants around the pond periphery provide a nice level of neighborhood buzz.

Included within the park is a bird sanctuary, a children's zoo, a mini-amphitheater and the world-famous Ghibli Museum (separate review). Plenty to see here.

In the center of the park is Inokashira Pond, with a floating pedestrian bridge spanning the width and even a boat rental facility. Rowboats and peddle-powered swan boats are available for rent at reasonable prices.

Plan a half day for a leisurely once around the pond walk to enjoy the discoveries of the park and surrounding neighborhood.

~dean

On of the fantastic parks in Tokyo. Beautiful cherry blossoms and tons of people during Hanami: Picnic with friends and families and coworkers to enjoy watching beautiful blooming cherry blossoms. Usually alcohol included.  season. Many flea markets and fun events. You can get fun encounters too.

~keiko

It's located near Kichijo-ji station so you can enjoy walking through the shopping street too.

One more thing, there is an urban legend in Japan that says couples should not go there because they will end up breaking up afterwards. But many couples visit here. I want to research on this topic and see whether this legend is true or not someday. lol

Anyway I wouldn't worry, just ignore it and chalk it up to another legend!!!! lol

~matt

Love Inokashira Park.  Have been relaxing there (drinking, jogging, walking, eyeing beautiful women) for 15 years and counting.  After an afternoon of hard relaxing,  swing by "2Papas" in Kichijoji for an authentic, American-style steak sandwich and a pint or cocktail.  Good atmosphere and a great mix of locales, Japanese and foreigners.

~david

Definitely a park worth checking out!

Just minutes from Kichijoji Station, this park is great for walking, running, just hanging out, and especially great for "hanami," or cherry blossom viewing in the Spring. There is a pond where you can rent paddleboats and you will often see couples renting them.

~kassy

Good place to walk.
Located close to the Kichijoji Station.
The park has a big pond, and is it the starting point of Kandagawa River.  
You can walk around the pond maybe in half an hour.
Good place for Hanami in April.   Many visitors do not go to "Nishien", western park, but it is also a good place to walk.
The park has a zoo.    Although it is not too much exciting, it is a good place for calming your mind.  You can see Hanako, the oldest elephant in Japan.

~matsuo

This park is Inokashira, not Inogashira, don't need to be voiced.
This is very famous park in the countryside or in the places having a lot of houses.
But you can come here easily by train.
Also there are some trains to come, so it is very convenient.

Many people come here at any time.
But especially in the season of cherry blossoms blooming and leaves turning yellow, too many people to imagine come here.
This is because this becomes incredibly beautiful.

If you have some time to drop in here, it is better to come, if it is only a few minutes!!

~kota

We walked through this park from Kichijoji Station to get to StudioGhibli and suffice to say that Miyazaki chose the spot for his studio BECAUSE it was near Inokashira park and he envisioned it to be part of the whole experience of visiting Ghibli. Although we went in Dec, it was still delightful to see and we saw kids playing like it wasn't cold at all!

~renkuka

Great park at all seasons - nice lake in the middle as well as a small shrine. Plenty of green space for everything, playing, leisure or just walking around.

~kasia

Even though the park is a bit out of the way, it is so worth visiting. The park is great for walking, jogging, courting, and playing with kids. You can rent a pedal boat to go around the lake in the park. The fall leaves were gorgeous. The park is close to Gibli Museum.

~peanuts

Super crowded during "Sakura" (cherry blossom season in spring) and crowded on the week-ends. Beautiful temple inside the park.

~chic

Inokashira Park is a fabulous place to visit any time of the year. There is always beautiful scenery and things to do. Nearby shopping and museums are also nice. Very photogenic bridge and pond. Not as crowded as other places.

~weed

This park is by far the best, and closest to Mitaka. It is a decent size. Great for running. And there is a really nice play area for kids in the park and "next door" at the Gibli museum

~lousi

Best to plan it on a Sunday, get on the Inokashira line from Shibuya, and get off at Inokashira Koen station, and walk through the park to Kichijoji, a wonderful suburb bustling with great cafes and fashion stores. Sundays, the park has a craft market with various artists and craftsmen selling their wares. Musicians too gather and often there is an impromptu concert. And for Pokemon Go tragics, yes, on Sunday the park is swarming with pocket monsters!

~lucia

Had a fab time in the sunshine with my girlfriend here. We got there early in the morning and spent time wandering around the park and visiting the shrine and temple before going on to the zoo. It's not a massive place but it is worth going to if you are nearby and want to fill a few hours.

~tom

I love this beautiful park, every time I want to go to a park to chill and look at the "ducks"swimming. They are boats shape like ducks but also plenty of real ducks swimming around. If you need a quiet time here, just don't come on the spring time when the hanami picnic! (cherry blossom viewing) 
There's a zoo inside and it connects mitaka and close to the ghibli museum. It's a bit of a long walk though.

~lynda

We decided to hit up kichioji on a Sunday so the kids would run around and we could get out of the city. It was an awesome park! About 10 min walk from the train station, and lots of little stores eateries and a big mall along the way.

The park itself was awesome. 600-700¥ for a 30 min paddle boat ride, lots of snacks around, a shrine, a zoo, and many paths to explore. We didn't see a playground at all but the kids (ages 4,6,9) enjoyed themselves. I highly recommend the zoo inside the park if you have kids. Adults were ¥400 and kids were free....stop at a 7-11 and grab some snacks to eat....lots of tables, benches etc....to sit down and eat.

All in all if you want a great place to wonder around, with lots of shade check it out for sure!

~kim

The Director of Studio Ghibli, Hayao Miyazaki designed the museum himself using story boards similar to the ones he creates for his films. This is a must see for the young and old. The museum building is part of the exhibit and allows people to experience it uniquely through their own eyes and ears. A great day away from the busy city of Tokyo or a half day as you please. And easy to commute from your hotel in Tokyo and back through Japans great high speed train system.

~minew

This park is very close to JR Kichijoji station. Take your time walk around the lake and watch locals draw, read or simply converse. Out on the water are row boats and paddle swan type boats. I watched a street performer and thought he was really good. Toilets are in very good condition. There are some second hand type stores close by which is the first time I've seen these stores in Japan. Larger stores including Yodabashi aren't far away.

~jennifer

Just a normal park, with a huge size and lots of sakura trees. So you better visit this place around Spring time. It is not crowded by the morning, it gets crowded by afternoon due to some sport activity. It is a very good place to have sport activity from light tracking to a baseball. There is a zoo in the complex and a shinto shrine worth visiting. This park will connect kichijoji to the famous ghibli museum.

~michael

We love visiting Kichijoji in the western Tokyo suburbs. On the north side of the station it's all about hectic shopping and nightlife. However, on the south side of the station, about a 5 minute walk, is this beautiful huge park, with a lake, walking paths, and nearby hip restaurants. It's a good place to people watch, especially Japanese families on an outing. I probably wouldn't travel across the city for it, but, when near Kichijoji, it's not to be missed.

~ellis

This park has a beautiful pond and lots of sakura trees around it! So beautiful at the beginning of April. The park can be reached by Inokashira line from Shibuya (get off at Inokashira Koen sta) or Chuo line from Shinjuku, Yotsuya, and Tokyo (get off at Kichijoji sta, South exit). There are a lot of food options near the park, to relax after a walk. Try the Yakitori (grill chicken) restaurant at the Kichijoji entrance or Thai restaurant inside the park. Starbucks can be found at the Kichijoji entrance.

~ichao

Visited ghibli museum on a thursday morning during the first week of April 2015. Gave the cafe a miss after seeing the queue and decided to walk to Kichijoji station. So I went to the area right beside the museum and saw a few huge cherry trees in full bloom with a few people sitting underneath the trees. As the area was very peaceful and not crowded, I went and sat on an unoccupied bench and had a impromptu picnic with the food which I bought from Mitaka station. This turned out the be one of the most memorable events during the trip - soaking in the beauty of the scenery and feeling of peacefulness. I think I was the only foreigner in that area.

After the picnic, I made my way to Kichijoji station. The crowd became bigger and bigger with lots of locals and tourists, especially at the lake/pond. I like the shops in between the park and kichijoji station that added to a vibrant holiday-like atmosphere.

~ted

It was a wet day when we visited this park. The cherry blossoms were still a sight to behold although they were about 60% left. The park is within walking distance from the Kichijoji station.

~lian

Picnic at this park before or after Ghibili Musuem visit. If u go in Speing or autumn, one of the most beautiful place to be. Free admission!!

~isala

From kichijoji station, there are many small interesting shops which leads to the park. The autumn colors are beautiful.

~david

I walked while this park, from kichijoji station to Ghibli Museum. I walked this park when autumn leave and afternoon time, so cold days. looks so mysterious place as fairytale or dorama places. we just two, maybe it takes a long way but I can't feel tired at all. it's so great place for walking

~novia

Kichijoji is already a cool neighborhood. This park is where all the hipsters go to display their art and talents. My favorite? The guy who has comic books displayed on a blanket and will act out whichever of your chosing.

Great place for a picnic or a swan boat ride (if you're cool with everyone watching because it is a small pond.) 

Big roaches and mosquitos in the summer, but still a good place to open a tall boy and relax by the water.

People are always playing music. Sometimes a cello or harp.

There is also a scenic train track that runs through the park. Lots of moss. Cool place.

~miley

Spent a few hours here on our way to and from the Ghibli Museum. Kids loved a trip on the paddle boats in the lake. The zoo was closed but the autumn colors were spectacular.

~johan

Great park to walk, visit zoo, relax and watch swan boats. Ma ny trails throughout the park leading back to the neighborhoods.

~cindy

During autumn I had the opportunity to walk between Mitaka and Kichijoji via the park. It provided an interesting array of shrines, views across the pond and back towards the commercial area. While I visited on a grey day, it gave the impression of a restful place where people could enjoy a respite away from the surrounding neighbourhoods.

~kim

I love this park for the lake, the small boats you can rent and the convenience (close to metro).

It is not huge but a lot of benches around the water to sit on

~jenn

The park is actually quite scenic, with vibrant colours in autumn and beautiful cherry blossoms in spring. It does get really crowded on weekends, so be mindful of that. There will be couples lining the benches, feeding each other french fries when you get into the more picturesque seasons, but that's part of the fun.

~kim

A nice place to visit over a weekend if you just want to chill and do a spot of people watching, especially in summer, where you have people engaging in leisure activites, like music, painting and jogging. Paddle crafts and row boats are available for hire and the park is large enough for an hour leisurely stroll. If you like, you can walk to the Ghibli Museum too; or visit Inokashira Zoo that's located within the park too.
Proximity to Kichijoji station means lots of options for dining, if you don't want to dine at the few eateries located within the park.

~lee

The park is not so large and it is surrounding the lake. The atmosphere is relaxing as well as a popular as a dating spot. However, it is a typical garden park like other in Japan.

~seng

Not a huge garden, but makes you relieve from a busy day.
Inside the park have a cute red shrine for wishing a good luck and Thai restaurant that its famous also.

~aim

The park is large and beautiful. We walked through it and found it very relaxing. It's not far from the train station and you can visit it from the Ghibili Museum

~delicia

A lot of the Tokyo parks get very busy at Blossom time and this is no exception. If you want to get. Place to sit down under the trees get there early. The park itself is compact with an entrance to the zoo. The boating lake is great fun, with either pedal boats or rowing boats. There are places to get snacks and ice cream too, plus toilet facilities. A tranquil place in bustling City.

~wynn

I have been many times to this wonderful little park. It looks different over the different seasons and is always very enjoyable. Just like other reviewers mentioned it is a great place for people watching, walking or just relaxing. Located very close to Kichijoji station which is very handy as Kichijoji in itself is a great place to explore.

~silvia

This park is not so big, but have many good points,close to Kitijoji station, good restaurants in park, and Inokashira Zoo is a part of park. Weekdays here not so many people, u can be just sheeted around the pond and it's really relaxing. Every Weekend market open in the park, then you can find good handmade souvenirs, and there are many street parformers. If you come to Tokyo, I recommend this park cause maybe differrent from those in Shinjuku, Ueno or Roppongi, more local and silent.

~yusan

Came here on a Friday morning and there were so many people doing all sorts of activities. I can only assume they were from the neighborhood. There were plenty of joggers and strollers as with any large park. From my readings, this park was gifted to the people of Tokyo from the Emperor. This park also houses the Ghibli Museum but I gave up trying to figure out how to buy advance tickets as it seems that is the only way to enter. 

The koi water features and shrine adds a nice touch to the park. It's a bit odd that there is a zoo in the park as well as another zoo across the street. Maybe they showcase different types of animals? 

The park is about a 15 minutes walk from Kichijoji Station. Great place to go for a relaxing stroll.

~komi

Recommended to walk in the morning or evening hearing lots of birds singing or walk in the daytime with cool air under the shades of trees in Summer or enjoy sunshine in Winter.
You will love this place year round.

~okano

Beautiful on weekends, or before / after shopping in Kichijouji. Well kept and nice lake with swan pedal boats / rowing boats. No Fee! (unless I overlooked something). Been there also late evening for dinner, the bridge over the lake is illuminated, looks very nice. Can;t wait to get a chance to go during cherry blossom. When you check out Kichijouji, or visit the nearby zoo / Ghibli museum, do yourself a favor and visit this park to give your mind a break.

~capri

This is a large well maintained park a short walk down a narrow lane from the South exit of Kichijoji Station on the JR Chuo line. I have visited there many times through the years and always enjoy the people watching and the interaction with the many dogs being walked there. A pleasant place to spend a few hours when the weather allows.

~ian

Recommended time to visit this park: mornings on weekdays. Thats when you get to enjoy the peace and quiet and relax. If you go there early in the morning, around 6:30, you could join in the "RADIO TAISO" with the locals. It's open for everyone. 

On weekends, especially if the weather is fine, this park becomes very crowded and active. If you don't mind the crowd, it would be fun to walk around the pond while eating ice cream cones, watch street performers do their thing, and maybe visit the small and charmiming zoo.

~eri

I went to Inokashira Park for the Ghibli Museum but took a stroll in it before and after my visit to the museum and it is indeed a great place to chill, hang out and have a quick snack whilst overlooking the pond. 

There is abundance of trees and even trail walks deeper into the park (you almost feel like you're in a forest instead) and there are restaurants and snack shops. The main attraction of this park besides Ghibli Museum is the boat ride. They have swan shaped paddle boats, regular paddle boats and row boats which is an incredibly fun activity to do - a great change from shopping at Tokyo. The swan boats are 700JPY, paddle boats and row boats are 600JPY for 30 minutes and you get a different view of the park plus good bonding time with the ducks!

I went with my boyfriend so it was a good activity to do as a couple and we really enjoyed the intimacy! Really fun dating activity to do if you are there and a thoroughly fun experience!

~steve

This park is beautiful, we had a great day exploring, riding on the pedal power boats. That was a good work out for the legs! Huge fish in the lake that come right up to you. Lovely water fountains in the middle of the lake, shops to buy food and drink. We visited the temple which like all temples was lovely. Highly recommend this place, would love to go here again.

~daniel

I go to Inokashira park about once a month, it is a GREAT park. 
My favorite spot is, of course, the lake where you can ride swan shaped paddle boats (or traditional row boats) around the lake. It can be crowded on holidays (especially romantic holidays), so make sure to come early. 
It is especially beautiful during the spring or fall, when flowers are blooming or leaves are changing color. 

All around the park, they have tons of free performances (magic shows, musicians, balloon animals) that are great for kids or couples. 

There's a nearby (cheap) zoo too, which is great to visit afterwards.

~grace

This is a lovely woodsy park around a very large pond; self-powered swan boats are available as are rowboats. There is an athletic field nearby. Such a pleasure to stroll there on a nice day!.

~nicole

This is a beautiful place! You can walk right around the two sections of the lake or take the short cut across the bridge to just walk part of it. The street leading down to the park from the station is fun too with groovy shops to explore. Take a paddle boat or just stroll around. There's a lovely red trimmed temple on the west end, a few little tori gates tacked away nearby and even some nice places to eat inside the park. (e.g. Pepa Cafe, a open air Thai place, is near the bridge on the south side.) Weekends are super busy when venders set up stalls and buskers come out. Great people watching. (There's also a Zoo but I've not been.)

~glenda

When we lived in Japan, we used to take the kids here on the weekends sometimes. It was a nice, leisurely train ride from our apartment. The reasons I love this park are numerous, but to name a few... First, it is definitely quieter than Ueno park. Ueno is great for the zoo and museums, but this one is great for relaxing with the kids. The zoo here is also quite nice. Second, there is a big lake with rental boats shaped like swans. Third, the cherry blossom trees are beautiful. And, finally, it's in the suburb of Kichijoji... which has reasonably priced department stores for household goods, plants, etc. AND a terrific Irish pub that serves the most amazing food and drink. The pub, by the way, is not actually in the park, but a short walk from it. It's just a nice way to spend the day away from the hustle and bustle of Tokyo.

~peter

We walked around in this size able park for about an hour, just getting a break from all the buildings. You can rent a pedal boat on the lake and there are several playground areas for kids. We enjoyed a soda at a little restaurant near the west entrance to the park and zoo. We walked from this park to the nearby Ghibi Museum; signage was clear and abundant.

~mike

It was a wonderful Spring Sunday and the weather was great, and we decided to go Sakura Hanami at Inokashira Park (井の頭恩賜公園), away from the famous city park like Ueno Park because we knew it would be crowded. However, when we reached Inokashira Park at the evening, the park was packed with people drinking and doing their hanami stuff under the trees, and don't even think of taking the boat ride, because the queue was endless. Anyway, it was still a great place to go, less touristy, and you could experience the more local stuff there.

~alex

Inoksahira Park( (井の頭恩賜公園, Inokashira Onshi Kōen) is a public garden which is excellent for the family to visit during spring, summer and autumn. Whenever I visit Kichijoji (the park is just 5 mins walk from the JR station), I would invitably take a walk by the park, soaking up the local culturen/activities. If you find the middle of the lake too noisy, go to either ends of the lake. This is a much better public park than Ueno Park which is filled with drunks. The houses around the park are also very quaint. 

The park has a petting zoo and a small aquarium. It is wonderful to see artists, musicians and street performers about the park. It is also walking distance to the Ghibli Museum.

I love buy beef balls from Satou Steak House, takao balls and sit by the lake to watch the world goes by........

~tom

Inokashira Park is a Tokyo Metropolitan park in Kichijoji, which is very popular in Tokyo. It is a relaxing place for citizens with a lot of green. Promenades are built around a big pond called Inokashira Pond in the heart of the park, so you can enjoy walking there. Also there is a copse preserving the appearance of Musashino at Gotenyama. Its total area is about 400,000 square meters and there are the Ghibli Museum, a zoo and an athletic field.

In autumn colored leaves create beautiful scenery.

~kasi

Outline

Inokashira Park is a Tokyo Metropolitan park in Kichijoji, which is very popular in Tokyo. It is a relaxing place for citizens with a lot of green. Promenades are built around a big pond called Inokashira Pond in the heart of the park, so you can enjoy walking there. Cherry blossoms in spring and colored leaves in autumn create beautiful scenery. Also there is a copse preserving the appearance of Musashino at Gotenyama. Its total area is about 400,000 square meters and there are the Ghibli Museum, a zoo and an athletic field. 

Inokashira Pond

Inokashira Pond is located in the heart of the park and an extremely large pond covering 43,000 square meters. It is a scenic pond over which branches of trees push out. The view from Nanaibashi Bridge and Hyotanbashi Bridge are recommendable. In particular the scenery from Nanaibashi Bridge in the season of cherry blossoms is excellent. Inokashira Pond is fed by a spring and a headstream of the Kanda River. In the Edo period (1603 - 1868), it was the water source of the Kanda Waterworks and supported the lives of people in Edo (former Tokyo). In addition, there is fine spring water called Ochanomizu on the west of the pond and it is said that Ieyasu TOKUGAWA (a leader of samurai) used the water to make tea. A boat boarding point is located at the pond and you can ride in a rowboat for 700 yen per an hour. There is urban legend that a couple that rides in a boat in Inokashira Park would separate, but it is thoroughly rumor so please enjoy a boat without caring about it.

Inokashira Benzaiten Shrine

Benzaiten Shrine is located at the edge of Inokashira Pond. It has been familiar to the common people since the Edo period and its vermilion-lacquered building is wonderful. It is said that the shrine was established in the 10th century and the present building was rebuilt in 1928. The god of water is enshrined there and it is regarded as having the benefit of art, literature, rich harvest and money. It has good atmosphere so I recommend you visit there though it is not a very large shrine. 

The Ghibli Museum

The Ghibli Museum is also located in Inokashira Park. It is a museum of Studio Ghibli led by Hayao MIYAZAKI, the world famous animated filmmaker. You can enjoy Ghibli’s view of the world and the filmmaking process. For admission you need to purchase a ticket at Lawson, a major convenience store chain in advance. 

There are various general goods stores and restaurants between Kichijoji station and Inokashira Park and it is crowded with many people. Many unique shops are opened and it is very fun to walk there. 

I hope you visit Inokashira Park where you can enjoy various scenery. 

~george